Nov 11 14

Update from Sponsored Athlete Gene Meade

by admin
It was another hot and humid summer here in North Carolina. I had been training all summer long for the Grindstone 100 Trail Race, a brutally challenging event in The mountains of Virginia. It is actually 101.85 miles and has around 23,000 feet of climbing along the course. I am happy to report I completed the race in 35 hours and 54 minutes! This event usually has around a 30% drop out rate. We endured rain, wind and cold temps along the way. The race starts at 6pm on Friday night, so you run for two nights and finish up early Sunday morning. I had my Elete CitriLyte Flask with me the entire time, and used it exclusively for my hydration. I also kept some Tablytes with me as well.
 
Elete was a huge factor in both my training and race. I truly believe it helped not only hydrate me throughout my runs, but also helped me recover quicker so I could train at a higher level throughout the summer. After the Grindstone 100, I used Elete to help with my recovery. One week after the 100 miler, I ran as part of a team in the Tuna 200, a relay race from Raleigh, NC to Atlantic Beach, NC. I was part of a 12 person team that completed the 200 miles in 29 hours. I would up running three "legs" of the event and felt great considering the punishment I put my body through one week earlier.
 
I cannot thank you enough for your continued support. Elete has really helped me take my endurance performance to the next level. I have enjoyed spreading the word about your products, and have had several people from my gym and running community start using Elete not only for training, but for everyday hydration and mineral replacement.
May 21 14

Jeff Kerkove Rides the Eagle Outside Festival

by admin

Here is an update on Jeff Kerkove, an elete™ sponsored athlete, from the Topek-Ergon Racing Team Newsletter:

EAGLE OUTSIDE FESTIVAL – FIREBIRD XC
May 17, 2014
Eagle, Colorado, USA

The weekend of May 17-18 officially kicked off the mountain bike racing season in the high country of Colorado. Taking place at 6600 ft in Eagle, CO, the Eagle Outside Festival brought in over 30 bike industry vendors.  In addition to the festival and demos, the event also offers the Firebird.  What traditionally is a big 40-mile backcountry loop, was shortened to a 25-mile XC race due to snow on the higher elevations of the course.  That did keep the field from swelling to over 90 riders in the Pro/Open field.

Racing in his home town and on his home trails, Jeff Kerkove toed the start line for Team Topeak-Ergon USA aboard his Canyon Lux CF.  The start was violent, as over 90 men rolled out of the festival venue en route to the trails.  Jeff, known as an endurance specialist, rode in the top 20 as the field made their way to the singletrack.  "I knew the race would be hard with the rough trail late in the laps.  I cannot start fast, so I need to warm up to the pace," stated Jeff following the race.

Jeff hit the trail in a good position and knowing the course very well began to pick off riders in front of him.  The course is known to be smooth and fast, but with recent wet weather and cattle ranching near by, parts of the course became very very rough. "I was able to catch and pull away from my competition on the rough trails.  No doubt, the Canyon Lux CF was an advantage on the course today."

Jeff rode at his limit for nearly 2 hours to go onto finish in 18th place.  "This is the hardest I have ridden in this young season," said Jeff.  Watching from the sidelines was Ergon photographer, Angel King.  Angel following the race, "You could see Jeff getting faster as the race went on.  He just ran out of race course to better his position."

Next up for Jeff is the Ergon and SRAM sponsored 64-mile Gunnison Growler on May 25 in Gunnison, Colorado.

RESULTS
Jeff Kerkove, 18th, Pro/Open Men

STRAVA FILE
www.strava.com/activities/142402720 

Photos © Angel King / Ergon Bike

Mar 31 14

Jon Bernhard Inspires

by admin

Jon Bernhard is an inspiration to all of us here at elete.  A climber and cyclist with an uncureable lung disease, he works to push himself to new levels.  Along the way, he helps youth with similar challenges by taking them on climbing adventures.  Here is an update from him that we just received:

"We just returned and unpacked from our latest excursion to inspire and aid youth.  We got to climb, teach, listen, & share lives with 12+ kids.  Various volunteers pitched in to play an interactive role in kids lives and open new directions.

On our last "take the youth climbing" outing we got to piece together many great experiences for many climbers. Including some pediatric patients who got to make the journey to join us, some youth at risk kids learning to lead, & new friends we could lend some gear and shoes to. 

So, you start the week off right.  I met a couple of super excited college kids out in the Moab desert for the first time.  Amped and ready for action they are ready to hit up multi-pitch routes after doinking around single pitch stuff.  Not to be deterred, these resourceful young guns knew they were a bit short on gear but not short on enthusiasm. These fellows gladly borrowed the equipment they needed to head for their 3 pitch excursion.  Shortly after sunset they made their way back to the cars with broad grins, funny tales, & psyched for another tower. 

Up next bring in Caleb, aka Leb, once labeled as a true trouble maker who would fight, steal, & cheat.  Ha, biggest mistake a school sytem could ever put on a kid.  Graduated high school early, earned heaps of scholarships, and graduating college with honors.  Not content to settle there, Leb cant wait to head for Yosemite after graduation so he brought his drive to achieve to the crags ready to learn to lead climb in preparation for long free routes in the Valley.
After a few easier routes placing gear on lead, Caleb quickly was leading 5.10s on gear. Learning from some old dawgs about setting anchors, rapelling, & thinking as a multi-pitch climber. 
I’m personally looking forward to long routes in Yosemite with Caleb in a few months.  I hope I can keep up.  Ugh.

Bring in the quiet one, Izzy.  From a troubled past to self-supporting in college, quiet on the outside, brave and ready for a challenge on the inside.  In no time, Izzy was cruising the sustained 5.8 cracks of Moab area with never ever really climbing before. 

Best for last, Nora, only 9 years old, prepares for her upcoming journey to Devil’s Tower, WY. Overcoming shyness and fear, Nora excelled at footwork and rope techniques during the day and asked endless questions about routes on Devil’s Tower around the campfire every night. All in all, a great week in the desert running our programs in support of youth in adventures."
 

Feb 18 14

Tracy Barnes Awared Fair Play Award

by admin

Today (Feb 18) Tracy was awarded the United Nations UNESCO Fair Play Award. Since its foundation by UNESCO and a number of international sports governing bodies in Paris in 1963, the goal of the International Committee for Fair Play is the worldwide defense and promotion of fair play. In order to honor and directly recognize the acts of fair play performed either within or outside the sports world, the International Committee for Fair Play annually awards Fair Play Prizes to personalities who have proved to be excellent ambassadors of fair play. Tracy was given the Pierre de Coubertin World Trophy – for an athlete or team for an act of fair play. Pierre de Coubertin was the founder of International Olympic Committee and is consider the father of the modern Olympic Games. This award has been instrumental in promoting sportsmanship both on and off the field. It is a huge honor in sports to receive this award. Very few are given out annually. Here is what Tracy had to say in accepting this award:

“I think sportsmanship, which this award embraces, is a way for people to go beyond the playing field, or the ski course and recognize that there is more to sport than just a win. Sportsmanship is about creating champions, both on and off the field. And while I am not a champion in my sport, I do strive to be a good person and do the right thing. In sport there is winning and there is losing and sometimes in order to win you must lose or at least sacrifice the win. I didn’t go to the Olympics to compete, but I feel I have won. I had the most incredible experience of cheering my twin sister and best friend in the greatest sporting event in the world. And I couldn’t be more proud of her effort. In biathlon Lanny was not only my best friend, but my greatest competitor. And I’ve come to realize over the years that without your competition there is no sport. You have to show the same kind of respect to your competitors that you do to your teammates. That’s what makes you a good competitor both in life and in sport. I hope that my story will help to inspire people to do something good for the people they care about. Their friends, their family, their teammates, their competitors and their neighbors.

I for one have been surrounded by incredibly inspiring people my entire life and I have to say that their selflessness has rubbed off on me. Both my grandparents were in the army and air force and served their country. Our men and women in uniform are the ones who make the ultimate sacrifice, sometimes with their life so that we can enjoy our freedoms. Both my parents were school teachers and their selfless dedication to their students and that of all teachers continues to inspire me. And my older sister is a doctor and surgeon. Her dedication to helping others is a model I will continue to strive for in my life. So, if I may, I’d like to dedicate this to my family who have supported me and given me a purpose to live by and also to our men & women in uniform, our teachers, and our doctors who work to selflessly help others on a daily basis. May we all strive to dedicate ourselves to others so that we may enrich each others lives in sport and otherwise.

Thanks for seeing something in me that I may never have had the opportunity to see myself. Thanks to the International Fair Play Committee for this incredible honor and thank you to the US Olympic Committee for being such wonderful hosts.”

Congratulations to both Tracy and Lanny for their efforts, their achievements, and for their love of their sport and for each other.  Here at elete, we have all been inspired by their story.

Jan 31 14

Facebook Feedback

by admin

We have had some great feedback recently on Facebook.  If you haven't done it already, please "Like" the elete Facebook page to keep up with some of the great success and motivational stories from our fans.  We appreciate our social media community, and hope you will enjoy participating.

Jan 16 14

Twin Biathletes Make Headlines Worldwide

by admin

This week, we received an email from Tracy and Lanny Barnes telling us what has since become worldwide news:

"Sunday, I (Tracy) was named to the Olympic Team! I cannot think of any greater honor in the world, save one… Lanny fell ill during the trials and was unable to race enough of the races she needed to qualify for the Olympic Team. She is having a stellar year and I for one want to see where she can take it…what heights she can climb to. So, in honor of friendship, cooperation, and sacrifice I declined my spot on the Olympic Team. This freed up a spot so that Lanny could be named to the team."

We are honored to continue to sponsor Tracy and Lanny, providing elete Electrolyte products as they continue to push themselves "faster, higher and stronger."  We invite you to follow their inspiring story with us as we cheer on Lanny in Sochi next month.

Jan 16 14

Background On Biathletes Tracy and Lanny Barnes

by admin

For those who are new to the sport of biathlon, the Olympic winter sports combining cross-country ski racing with rifle marksmanship, it is a physically demanding, riveting sport to watch, and it’s easy to see why. "With their hearts pounding nearly three times a second, the athletes struggle to control their breathing as they shoot, knowing that every shot and the number of seconds it takes to make it, will determine who stands on the podium that day," states the U.S. Biathlon on its web site (www.usbiathlon.com). While biathlon is a sport that hasn’t received the attention it deserves in the U.S., it is a popular sport in Canada and Europe. It is consistently ranked as one of the top-rated winter sports shown on European television.

The Barnes sisters, from Durango, Colo., are big believers in elete™ Electrolyte Add-In.  Here are their thoughts from an interview with elete™ in 2007.

How did you both become involved in biathlon?

"When we were both 14, we met a guy working a biathlon. Being big soccer players at the time, we thought it would be a great way to stay in shape in the summer. At age 15, we began participating in biathlon races. We thought it would be a huge challenge, and we quickly excelled at it."

Biathlon seems to be one of the most physically demanding and mentally challenging sports owing to the fact that athletes have to first, be in top condition to race, and second, have to have incredible focus and stamina to be able to –in split second time — transition from racing to focusing, aiming, and shooting — all while being timed.

"It's definitely a hard transition from one discipline to the next in just a few minutes. The skiing does literally physically drain your body, and then you ski in and have to immediately devote all of your focus for the shooting. But it’s very rewarding when both disciplines come together. It’s not everyday when the skiing and the shooting are one. But there are those days when they both come together, and when they do, there’s no better feeling in the world."

What is the biggest factor in terms of winning a biathlon?
"Practice definitely. We also do drills to prepare our mind because if you are too focused on the shooting, your skiing will suffer. Likewise, if you’re too focused on the skiing, you’re going to suffer more missed targets. So we visualize different scenarios while we’re out training. We practice different techniques, and we are constantly thinking of things that we need to adjust while we are training."

What is your typical training regimen?
"We usually start out in the morning with a run. We run for 39-40 minutes before breakfast. Following breakfast, we train two to three hours, cross-country skiing endurance intervals, etc.. If there’s no snow, we train using rollerskis, which are 2-foot long skates with wheels on the end. We do a lot of road biking, mountain biking, running. After lunch, we do a further two- to three- hour training focusing on our shooting. We also combine one to two physical workouts with the shooting."

Any indispensable items or tried-and-true key strategies you’ve found helpful in giving you an added edge over other athletes?
"The biggest thing is staying hydrated. We’ve also found with elete™ electrolytes, it completely got rid of muscle cramping. Even though you’re training a lot in the cold weather, you’re working your muscles just as hard as you would in warm- to hot-temperatures. So, we’ve found that elete™ keeps us hydrated and that it helps us recuperate more quickly after our workouts. We also follow a strict nutrition plan to keep our blood sugar levels constant, avoiding spikes in blood sugar and drops. We want our blood sugar to be steady at all times. elete™ electrolytes helps a lot with that. Sports drinks spike the blood sugar. We’ve found that elete™ electrolytes has helped to maintain our blood sugar."
 
How did you initially find elete™ Electrolyte Add-In?
"Well, we spend a lot of time in Utah training. We met a guy participating in a venue in Soldier’s Hollow, and he was telling us about this product called elete™ Electrolyte Add-In. We tried it and noticed a difference right away in the cramping and, later, it helped speed recovery."

What have been your experiences using elete™ electrolytes?
"We definitely use elete™ Add-Infor all of our major workouts. We make sure that we’re drinking elete™ water during our training to replenish the electrolytes we’re losing while we’re training. Also, afterwards, we drink elete™ water to speed recovery and, again, to replenish lost electrolytes. The biggest difference has been with our cramping. Before, we would have all sorts of cramps in the heat — leg cramps, side cramps. So, elete™ helped with our cramping. Plus, we’ve also found that we recover faster after a hard training. We are able to bounce back quicker."

What would you tell people about elete™ Add-In?

"I [Lanny] would recommend it over other sports drinks because one, there’s no high sugar content, which is found in sports drinks, and two, people get the benefit of electrolytes [from elete™] as they would with a sports drink. Whether they are walking, riding a bike, whatever the sports, people will definitely have a more enjoyable workout experience because elete™ gets rid of muscle cramps and speeds recovery.
 

Dec 16 13

Barnes Update from Austria and Minnesota

by admin

Good Morning and Happy Holidays!!! Tracy and I are getting closer and closer to the final step in the Olympic trials process and we’ve been racing all over the world in preparation. 

Lanny at the Starting Gate in Hochfilzen, Austria

Last weekend Lanny was in Hochfilzen, Austria for some World Cup biathlon action. Lanny started there with a sprint race and woke up the morning of the race to fierce winds that rattled the windows on her hotel room. The storm that was ensuing outside also brought heavy snow and wind drifts. The weather in biathlon has always been one of an athletes toughest competitors. It is unpredictable, ruthless, and doesn’t back down for anyone. Lanny Places 65th in the sprint and had the best US women’s finish of the dayLanny battled the elements and extremely tough blizzard like conditions to place 65th in the sprint and had the best US women’s finish of the day. Although she would have hoped for better she came back the next day to help her teammates to tie there best ever relay result with an 8th place out of 23 nations. As the anchor leg of the team, Lanny had one of the fastest shooting times of the day and hit all of her targets to secure the 8th place finish. This week Lanny will put in a hard week of training for the Olympic trials that take place in Ridnaun, Italy at the IBU up the first and second week in January.

Tracy Races today and battles another one of Mother Natures challenges in the North American cup races in Minnesota with temperatures expected to be only +3 F. She will battle the top American and Canadian biathletes in two races this weekend and two more on Tuesday and Wednesday before joining Lanny in Italy for a training camp over Christmas. We will keep you posted on how her races go. 
 
Thanks for all your support and for being a part of our Olympic Dream. Sometimes in life we not only have to battle our competitors and the fiercest conditions planet earth has to offer, but we must battle ourselves to find out who we really are. If there is one thing this Olympic journey has taught us is that we have the most supportive friends and family out there and they have motivated us to never give up! Thanks for helping us in this journey!! Merry Christmas and we wish you and your family a safe and Happy Holidays. 
 
-Tracy & Lanny
Dec 5 13

More from the Twin Biatheletes

by admin

Off to a great start!

            The second weekend of racing took Lanny to Beitostolen, Norway where she once again posted some great results. The first race was a 15 kilometer individual race where shooting is the key with a minute added on to your overall time for each missed target at the shooting range and four total bouts of shooting. Lanny skied well and shot great, but ended up with 2 penalties out of 20. Despite the missed targets she ended up placing 18th out of 100 competitors and not far out of the running for a medal. The next day was a much shorter race known as the sprint. This race only has 2 shooting stages, one prone and one standing. The previous weekend lanny placed 13th with clean shooting, this weekend she had one penalty and placed 16th. The best part about this result was that even with a 16th place, she was much closer in time to the top 3. Lanny’s inching her way up towards the top! This week she’ll be in Hochfilzen, Austria for the World Cup. Her first race, which is a sprint race, is on Friday. On Saturday there’s a pursuit race and on Sunday a team relay.

            Tracy only had one race this past weekend and in the 15 kilometer individual she posted the fastest ski time of the day. She ended up with one bad shooting stage that put her out of the medals in 4th place. Despite her shooting she was psyched with her skiing and glad to have posted such a fast time. Tracy will take the week off racing to prepare for U.S. Nationals in Minnesota, after which she’ll head to Italy to join up with Lanny.

Nov 27 13

Lanny & Tracy Race Update

by admin

Lanny & Tracy want to extend a very Happy Thanksgiving to all of our friends, family, and sponsors. 

We are so thankful for all of you! Best wishes for a wonderful week.

Race Update:

       The first weekend of the Olympic Biathlon season brought twin biathletes’ Lanny & Tracy Barnes quite a lot of success. Lanny was racing in the alpine town of Idre, Sweden while Tracy was at the 1988 Calgary Olympic Biathlon Venue in Canmore, Canada. Both Lanny and Tracy had two sprint races which consists of three 2.5 kilometer loops for skiing and 2 shooting stages, 1 prone and 1 standing. Sweden was struggling a bit for snow and Lanny found herself on a strip of man-made snow that covered the two and half kilometer loop. The field was large with over a hundred women in each race. The first race bode well for Lanny. She skied well and shot clean (ten for ten targets) and getting a spectacular finish in 13th place, not far off the top 10. The second day in Idre was a day that most just say “well, that’s biathlon.” The women woke up to severe winds, with gusts up to 40 mph. With the race being individual starts a day like that becomes luck of the draw. It all depends on when you are lucky enough to ski into the range and not get blown over. Lanny was not so fortunate, with quite a few penalties in the shooting. She had a good attitude about it though and laughed off what will probably turn out to be the worst shooting conditions of the year. Biathlon races are never canceled because of wind, rain, hail, blizzards, etc. The only reason a race may get canceled is a lack of snow. And both Lanny and Tracy have had their fair share of races like Sunday’s sprint where you do everything you can just to make it to the finish line in one piece.

            Across the big pond Tracy was witnessing some of the nicest conditions that this part of Canada had ever presented this time of year. Snow was plentiful and the temperatures were moderate. Most athletes usually don’t leave this area without a bit of frostbite, but with the forecast looking great, Tracy just might leave with all her fingers and toes. On Saturday Tracy ran away with the win, having just one miss in prone and hitting all of her standing targets. The next day Tracy was wearing the leaders bib and had a small target on her back. The competition was fierce and Tracy ended up with 2 penalties in prone and clean standing shooting. Two of her competitors shot clean and just beat her to the finish line. There will be two more races in Canmore next weekend and there will be a great battle for the leaders bib in the North American Cup series.

Take care,

-Tracy & Lanny Barnes
www.twinbiathletes.com